Les news de LTF

Made in France

#MadeInFrance 04 : baguettes & disquettes, an overview of the French computer gaming scene

Par Hoagie 21/01/2018 1 commentaire


French version / version française

A few days ago, the youtuber and podcaster @dosnostalgic said that the genesis of the French computer gaming scene was unfamiliar to him and wondered if there was some English resource on this subject. We didn't know if there was such resource on the web, but of course it's our field of expertise, and we're willing to share info. As we say in France, on n'est jamais si bien servi que par soi-même, so here is an overview of this scene in the 80's and 90's for our English readers.

titre A Brief History of Home Computing in France

The beginning of home computing in France is a bit messy. In the UK, the ZX81 was a huge success because it was very cheap and sold by mail and at WH Smith. There was no such thing in France : there were lots of models sold in computer shops, and they were often expensive. Several game developers started programming on TI-99/4A, ZX81 and even the obscure Memotech MTX 512. In 1984, the French computer stock included 170 000 ZX81, 30 000 ZX Spectrum and 50 000 Oric 1; the C64 hardly sold more than the ZX81 because of its poor distribution. Some French hardware manufacturers made their own models of computers : Exelvision and the EXL 100 (with its wireless keyboard and joysticks/numeric pads), Micronique and its Hector HRX, Matra with the Alice (whose only redeeming feature is its box illustration by Moebius), and the most important one, Thomson with the TO7 and the MO5. The TO7 featured an internal ROM cartridge player and an optical pen to draw on the TV screen. The MO5, whose software was incompatible with the TO7, was cheaper, had more RAM (48 Ko instead of 8 Ko for the TO7), but a separate tape player, and it was famous for its rubber keys. Both had a graphic resolution slightly superior to the ZX Spectrum.

The success of the Thomson computers was ensured by the famous government plan Informatique pour tous ("computing for everyone"). In February of 1985, the government submitted a bill for the growing French software industry (with copyright and anti-piracy laws) and bought more than 120 000 computers to equip French schools and help children to discover computing. Apple had promised to install its European computer factories in France and nearly got the deal, but finally almost all computers ordered were Thomson models. This plan only had a short-term effect : the teachers weren't always trained to use computers, and soon the machines were abandoned. However, lots of children discovered the computers with a MO5 or a TO7/70 (an upgraded version of the TO7), and these two models became, with the Minitel, the most iconic 8-bit computers in France in the 80's - the French video games preservation association MO5.COM owes them its name. If you want to try the best emulator of Thomson computers and their softwares, DCMOTO is the place to go.


The plan Informatique pour tous had another consequence : it considerably encouraged the development of educational software, by either specialized companies (Carraz) or computer game companies. Coktel Vision produced dozens of educational software and finally enjoyed a huge and well-deserved success in 1990 with the excellent series «Adi» (which is, to me, the «Dungeon Master» of educational software).

The other major event in home computing in France was the release of the Amstrad CPC 464 in late 1984, which took the country by storm. Several factors explain this success : the CPC 464 was cheap, sold with its small monitor (a significant advantage when almost all homes had only one TV set), it was easy to use ("plug and play", I could add), its design was great, its distribution was excellent (it was sold in department stores and in the mail-order catalog La Redoute), and its French ads starred a funny crocodile who become one of the most popular mascots of the 80's advertising. One third of the 8 millions CPC sold in eight years were sold in France, and Amstrad even had its own yearly computer show, the Amstrad Expo in Paris, from 1986 to 1990. All other 8-bit systems quickly declined. To discover the world of CPC à la française, I advise you to visit the referential website CPCRulez.

Highslide JS
A French Amstrad ad in 1987 (source : Abandonware Magazines)

After that, the computer and console market followed the same trend than in the rest of Europe : the war between ST and Amiga, the late availability of consoles, the rise of the PC as a gaming machine...

titre The So-Called "French Touch"

The French love to brag about the "French touch", a pretentious expression almost always used to describe French games that were influential or successful - oddly, no one ever evokes the French touch when it comes to Titus games. Foreign people prefer to call French games "weird". In its October 1991 issue, the magazine Amiga Power published a funny four-page article "Why are French games so weird ?" and failed to get a convincing answer. Why, then ?

At the beginning of the 80's, the French programmers started to create games from scratch. They weren't influenced by American games : the popular computers in the USA (Apple II, Atari 400, C64) flopped in the French home computing market. With the arrival of the ZX Spectrum and later the Amstrad CPC, the French became more aware of the British production. For instance, the Ultimate games were the main inspiration of «Crafton & Xunk» and «Little Big Adventure». Like the British, the French created lots of action games, and sport games as well, but in an unexpected proportion. It's strange that, for a decade, a country so addicted to soccer produced less soccer games than winter sports and tennis games, and only one soccer team management game (Answare's extremely obscure «Club de football» in 1984). And France produced many more adventure games, including a significant number of crime-solving stories - after all, France is the land of the série noire. Yes, but why ?

In my humble opinion, a major component of the spirit of French games is the considerable influence of comics. The French developers grew up reading Franco-Belgian comics and magazines like Spirou, Tintin, Pilote and Pif Gadget, and it shows. Some French games look like comics («B.A.T.», «Crash Garrett»), some even copy them (the cat in «Le passager du temps» is Gaston Lagaffe's cat). It's no surprise that, while the British software houses were obssessed with the conversions of movies and arcade games, the French software houses had a craze for adaptations of comics on computers. The list is long : Coktel Vision did some Astérix, Lucky Luke and Blueberry games, Cobra Soft did one Blake & Mortimer game («La Marque Jaune») and «Turlogh le rôdeur», Ubi Soft published one Gaston Lagaffe game («M'Enfin !») and «Ranx», and Infogrames, well... Infogrames did any comics they could : «Les Passagers du vent», «Iznogoud», «Bobo», Bob Morane, «La Quête de l'oiseau du temps», «The Toyottes», «Tintin sur la lune», les Tuniques bleues («North & South»)... And they continued on 16-bit consoles in the 90's with Tintin, Astérix, the Smurfs, Lucky Luke and Spirou.

Highslide JS
Le Passager du temps (CPC)
Highslide JS
La Marque Jaune (ST)
Highslide JS
Les Passagers du vent (CPC)
Highslide JS
La Quête de l'oiseau du temps (Amiga)
Highslide JS
North & South (ST)
Highslide JS
Tintin et le temple du soleil (PC)

Another huge influence was the extraordinary magazine Métal hurlant, that featured everything a geek could dream of : sci-fi, rock'n roll, avant-garde or ligne claire comics, reviews of movies, books and music, and even a column about strategy and war games signed by Général-Baron Staff - aka Jean-Patrick Manchette, a renowned crime novelist, and the author of the French translation of Alan Moore's "Watchmen". If you want to see how influential Métal hurlant was, just look at the production of ERE Informatique and Exxos : it's a whole tribute to the spirit of this magazine and its comics. The first French ad of «L'Arche du Captain Blood» and the screens of «Crash Garrett» even show a logo "Métal hurlant software" !

The link between comics and French computer games is not just a matter of influence : there were strong connections between the comics world and the computer world in the 80's. Several important computer game magazines contained short or long comic strips, and sometimes one or two pages of comic reviews. For instance, Micro News featured a long-running comic about video games, "Bargon Attack", that was eventually turned into an adventure game, and its creator, Rachid Chebli, became a graphic artist for Coktel Vision - and so did Thierry Ségur. Carali was the illustrator of the newspaper Hebdogiciel, his brother Edika, one of the weirdest French cartoonists, made the covers of two obscure CPC games («Bad Max» and «Les Dents de sa mère»), and his son Olivier Ka was a game reviewer for Joystick. Amstrad Cent Pour Cent had its covers designed by some more or less famous artists. Bruno Bellamy draw a lot for game magazines. And it worked the same with game companies : Jean Solé was a Mac fan and a collaborator of Froggy Software. Daniel Hochard, aka Imagex, wrote a few comics before turning into a graphic artist for computer games and a textile designer. Benoît Sokal designed some of Microïds' biggest selling games. Philippe Caza made a few covers for Infogrames.

The "weirdness" of the French designers just comes from their intensive reading of comics, and if you read any of Moebius' or Philippe Druillet's work, you know how imaginative they can be. It may also be one of the reasons why the French created so many textual adventure games in the 80's, with many pictures, few animations and short texts - unfortunately not of the same literary quality as Infocom or Magnetic Scrolls games. And it may explain too why France became the best and most productive European country for graphic adventures - and one of the first to do so : the ST version of «Le Manoir de Mortevielle» was released around the same time than «Maniac Mansion».

titre The Players

The golden age of French computer games is marked out by two dates. 1983 is the year of birth of three key players of this industry : ERE Informatique, Infogrames and Loriciels. 2002 is the beginning of a commercial crisis in the video game market that put several important companies out of business in three years : Lankhor in late 2001, Cryo and Kalisto in 2002, Delphine Software first in 2002, then in 2004, Silmarils in 2003, Adeline Software and Titus in 2004. Here are the most important players of this era in chronological order :

ERE Informatique / Exxos
ERE Informatique worked differently than the other software houses : they had almost no in-house development team. They worked as a book publisher : they received projects and demos from external developers, the editor Philippe Ulrich selected the games good enough to be published, and the artist Michel Rho drew the title screens and the box covers. The ERE Informatique range is a coherent mix of adventure and action titles, with a clear penchant for sci-fi and original scenarios. Some of their most memorable games are «Macadam Bumper», a great pinball construction set, «Crafton & Xunk», aka «Get Dexter», the French answer to Ultimate games, the adventure game «SRAM», the lovely «Bubble Ghost», and the strip-poker game «Teenage Queen». ERE Informatique also published the first games by Paul CuissetPhoenix») and Stéphane PicqBirdie»).
In 1987, ERE Informatique was bought by Infogrames. In 1988, their members launched the label Exxos for their more ambitious in-house games. The first Exxos game, «L'Arche du Captain Blood», was an artistic and commercial achievement. «Crash Garrett», «Purple Saturn Day» and «Kult» followed. The developers claimed Exxos was a divinity giving them the inspiration for their games. Every time the development of an Exxos game was completed, Philippe Ulrich publicly sacrificed one of the computers used to program it with the cry "ata ata hoglo hulu". Sadly, due to the financial difficulties of Infogrames, the team of ERE Informatique collectively quit in 1989 to form Cryo.

Highslide JS
Macadam Bumper (CPC)
Highslide JS
Crafton & Xunk (CPC)
Highslide JS
Bubble Ghost (CPC)
Highslide JS
Teenage Queen (Amiga)
Highslide JS
L'Arche du Captain Blood (ST)
Highslide JS
Kult (Amiga)

Infogrames
The company with the armadillo became in the 80's the first entertainment software producer in France. The recipe of their success : the "gift of the gab" of their co-founder Bruno Bonnell, some educational software, several crime-solving adventures («L'Affaire», «L'Affaire Vera Cruz», «L'Héritage»), lots of comics adaptations and a few other things like «Mandragore», one of the first French computer role-playing games, «Bivouac» or «Marche à l'ombre». They bought ERE Informatique and the intellectual property of Cobra Soft, and found in Epyx a reliable American distributor. Everything looked alright, but Infogrames almost sunk in the late 80's for several reasons : the flop of the terrible Bob Morane games, the cancellation of a promising merge with Epyx and the closure of their commercial partner FIL. They were narrowly saved by their deal for the European distribution of a game named «SimCity». Infogrames recovered and started the development of all types of games : original 3D worlds («The Light Corridor», «Alpha Waves»), role-playing («Drakkhen»), sport («Advantage Tennis»), and, of course, adventure : «Eternam», «Shadow of the Comet» and the seminal «Alone in the Dark». Infogrames diversified its activities in CDTV, CD-I, consoles, telematics (the network Infonie), and it was only the beginning...

Highslide JS
L'Affaire Vera Cruz (PC)
Highslide JS
Bivouac (CPC)
Highslide JS
Alpha Waves (PC)
Highslide JS
Drakkhen (PC)
Highslide JS
Eternam (PC)
Highslide JS
Alone in the Dark (PC)


A very early report in the Infogrames office, when Bruno Bonnell still had hair (or a toupee, who knows ?)

Loriciels
After the armadillo comes the kitten ! Founded by Laurant Weill and Marc Bayle, Loriciels was one of the most prolific developers and publishers on 8-bit systems : a few utilities, but above all lots of games - mainly action, text adventures and puzzles. The quality of the games was uneven, but some of them were unforgettable or historically important : «L'Aigle d'or» (by Louis-Marie Rocques, who later co-founded Silmarils), «Le 5ème Axe» (an excellent «Impossible Mission» clone for MO5), Eric Chahi's first two published games («Infernal Runner» and «Le Pacte»), «Sapiens» (an open-world survival simulation in Prehistoric times), the pretty funny «Billy la banlieue», the isometric adventures «Bactron», «MGT» and «Top Secret»... Based near Paris, Loriciels opened two small offices in Grenoble and Annecy and switched to 16-bit systems with once again several achievements : «Mach 3», one of the first 16-bit games with digitized voice and music in the title screen (even with the internal speaker of the PC), «Turbo Cup» (sold with a toy car and sponsored by the racing driver René Metge who wore the Loriciels logo on his car), the lovely «Skweek», «West Phaser» and its light phaser... In 1990, the company shortened its name to Loriciel, adopted a trendier new logo and tried to develop more complex games, like «Panza Kick Boxing», but they started to struggle with financial difficulties, released several compilations to stay afloat and finally closed in 1994. Don't hesitate to check out the fansite Loriciel.net to discover their catalogue.

Highslide JS
L'Aigle d'or (Oric)
Highslide JS
Le 5ème axe (MO5)
Highslide JS
Sapiens (MO5)
Highslide JS
Billy la banlieue (CPC)
Highslide JS
Skweek (ST)
Highslide JS
West Phaser (Amiga)

Froggy Software
Founded in 1984 by Jean-Louis Le Breton, Froggy Software had a very specific activity : they published only textual adventure games for the Apple II. This computer didn't sell a lot in France, and they refused to include a copy protection in their software, so none of their games was a huge success. In 1986, they released two adventures games for the Macintosh and closed down the following year. Jean-Louis Le Breton wrote a short history of the company on his website.

Highslide JS
Le Crime du parking (Apple II)
Highslide JS
Canal meurtre (Mac)

Cobra Soft
Probably unknown out of France, this was one of the most innovative French software houses of the 80's. Their most famous production is Meurtres, a range of crime-solving adventures. Meurtres sur l'Atlantique was sold in a big cardboard file, and the boxes of the three following games contained lots of physical objects and clues to solve the case : letters, newspaper cuts, carved stones... The box of «Murders in Space» was so full it was hard to close ! The battleship simulation HMS Cobra was sold in a boardgame-like box containing a map, a ruler, a protractor, two manuals and a 300-page book. Cobra Soft also made the first adaptation of a French movie on computers («Les Ripoux») and two boardgames adaptations («Maxi Bourse», «Full Metal Planete»). Their boss and lead designer, Bertrand Brocard, recently co-founded the CNJV and is one of the most active personalities of the video game preservation field in France.

Highslide JS
Meurtres en série (PC)
Highslide JS
Meurtres à Venise (Amiga)
Highslide JS
Murders in Space (PC)
Highslide JS
Les Ripoux (CPC)
Highslide JS
Maxi Bourse (PC)
Highslide JS
Full Metal Planete (Mac)

Coktel Vision / Tomahawk
Founded in 1984 by Roland Oskian, Coktel Vision produced the same kind of software than Infogrames : educational software and comics adaptations, as well as the innovative historical games designed by Muriel Tramis : «Mewilo» and «Freedom». «Mewilo» earned them a medal from the town council of Paris. In 1987, they used the label Tomahawk to publish their games and, with the help of game designer François Nédelec, they developed all kinds of games : erotic («Emmanuelle», «Geisha»), racing («Paris Dakar 1990», «Skidoo»), fighting («No Exit») and 3D exploration («Galactic Empire»). However, these games got mixed reviews. In 1990, with the incredible success of «Adi» , they decided to concentrate their efforts on adventure games (the Gobliiins trilogy, «Fascination», «Bargon Attack») and 3D games («A.G.E.», «Inca»). They significally improved their graphic skills and were one of the first French software companies to work on CD-ROM («E.S.S. Mega», «Fascination»). They were noticed by Sierra who entrusted their European distribution to them. In 1993, they were finally bought by Sierra and officially became Sierra France. They stopped game development in 1996.

Highslide JS
Mewilo (CPC)
Highslide JS
Freedom (ST)
Highslide JS
Emmanuelle (Amiga)
Highslide JS
Galactic Empire (PC)
Highslide JS
Gobliiins (PC)
Highslide JS
E.S.S. (PC)

Microïds
Financially supported by Loriciels during their first years of existence, Microïds had a surprisingly long carrier without any groundbreaking title in their eclectic catalog before 1996. Actually, one of their greatest achivements has been to keep producing adventure games after 1999, when the genre was considered dead : «L'Amerzone», «Post Mortem», «Syberia» (awarded "adventure game of the year" by Computer Gaming World in 2003)... Thanks to these games, they survived the 2002 crisis. Their most noticeable early games : the Super Ski trilogy, «Grand Prix 500 2», the puzzle game «Swap», «Nicky Boom», «Dominium» and «Genesia» (two flawed strategy games with interesting ideas)...

Highslide JS
Super Ski II (PC)
Highslide JS
Grand Prix 500 2 (PC)
Highslide JS
Swap (PC)
Highslide JS
Nicky Boom (PC)
Highslide JS
Dominium (PC)
Highslide JS
Genesia (PC)

Titus
Oh la la ! This is the company we love to hate. After a long streak of bad games («Crazy Cars», «Fire and Forget», «Wild Streets»), Titus signed a distribution and development deal with Disney Software in 1990 and made the equally bad «Dick Tracy» - the deal didn't last long, one year later Disney Software signed with Infogrames. After that, Titus finally got a grip with several great platform games : «Prehistorik», «The Blues Brothers», «Les Aventures de Moktar»... And «Crazy Cars 3» is the best of the trilogy. The games they made after 1994 are mostly forgettable. It's still a total mystery to me that with such a mediocre catalogue, they became big enough to buy Digital Integration and be the majority shareholder of Interplay and Virgin Interactive. Couldn't their investors make a better use of their money ?

Highslide JS
Fire & Forget II (PC)
Highslide JS
Dick Tracy (PC)
Highslide JS
Prehistorik (PC)
Highslide JS
The Blues Brothers (Amiga)
Highslide JS
Les Aventures de Moktar (PC)
Highslide JS
Crazy Cars III

Ubi Soft
The history of the company founded in 1986 by the Guillemot brothers can be split in two parts : before and after 1995. The pre-1995 Ubi Soft published - and sometimes developed - some historically significant French games : «Fer & flamme», «Zombi», «B.A.T.», the vaporware - or, as we say in a more poetical manner, l'Arlésienne - «Iron Lord». We can add to the list the enjoyable «Jupiter's Masterdrive» and «The Teller», one of Michel Ancel's first games. But Ubi Soft was also a software distributor. They imported in France the games of some of the most famous international publishers : Cinemaware, Spectrum HoloByte, Activision, Mirrorsoft, Elite, Domark... They also published the first games of the German team Blue Byte. In 1991, their game publishing activity almost came to a halt while they kept distributing foreign software (LucasArts, Novalogic, Bethesda Softworks, Adventure Soft) and released lots of compilations of old games. Meanwhile, they secretly opened development centers in France, Romania and, later, Canada. In 1995, Ubi Soft did its big comeback in the game development field with «Action Soccer» (designed in France, programmed in Romania), and, of course, «Rayman» - and the rest, as they say, is history.

Highslide JS
Fer & Flamme (CPC)
Highslide JS
Zombi (CPC)
Highslide JS
B.A.T. (ST)
Highslide JS
Iron Lord (Amiga)
Highslide JS
Jupiter's Masterdrive (Amiga)
Highslide JS
The Teller (Amiga)

Silmarils
This company founded by the brothers Louis-Marie Rocques and André Rocques never tried to open offices in other countries or conquer the world, it kept reasonable dimensions during its whole existence. Probably influenced by Psygnosis, graphically speaking (just compare their boxes), Silmarils produced mainly action/adventure games (the hit «Targhan», «Colorado», «Starblade», «Metal Mutant»), sci-fi management games («Storm Master», «Transarctica») and role-playing games (the Ishar trilogy). These game often have awkward design flaws, but they also have a strong graphic personality and imaginative scenarios and universes. If you don't want to play them, at least have at look at them, they're worth it.

Highslide JS
Targhan (ST)
Highslide JS
Colorado (PC)
Highslide JS
Metal Mutant (PC)
Highslide JS
Storm Master (PC)
Highslide JS
Transarctica (PC)
Highslide JS
Ishar (Amiga)

Lankhor
This small company earned its place in the hall of fame for its two Jérôme Lange adventures, the revolutionary «Le Manoir de Mortevielle» and «Maupiti Island» : mouse-driven interface, digitized voice for all dialogues (without any soundcard), innovative design, deep atmosphere and plot. The Amiga version of «Maupiti Island» is still a masterpiece of adventure games to my eyes. Their following game, «Black Sect», flopped and put them in serious financial trouble. They also released the excellent and ultra-fast racing game «Vroom» on ST and Amiga, some educational software («Rody & Mastico»), and several games made by independent developers, in the old ERE Informatique tradition : action games for the Amiga and the ST («Outzone», «G.Nius») and adventure games for the CPC («Alive», «Fugitif»). For more info, visit the great fansite Lankhor.net.

Highslide JS
Le Manoir de Mortevielle (Amiga)
Highslide JS
Maupiti Island (Amiga)
Highslide JS
Vroom (ST)

Ocean France
OK, Ocean was a British company, but their French bureau, opened in 1988 and led by Marc Djan, produced some of their best arcade conversions («Operation Wolf», «Pang», «Toki», the unreleased «Snow Bros»), as well as «Beach Volley» and «Ivanhoe». They deserved a mention here.

Delphine Software
Delphine Software was the game development division set by Delphine Records. It was managed by Michael Sportouch and joined by Paul Cuisset and Eric Chahi. After two action games («Bio Challenge» and «Castle Warrior»), they were the first in France to get inspiration from Lucasfilm Games and Sierra On-Line to make more dynamic adventures, and thus named their range "Delphine cinématique". They released an exceptional series of "cinematic" adventures and action/adventure games : «Les Voyageurs du temps», «Operation Stealth», «Croisière pour un cadavre», «Another World», «Flashback», «Fade to Black»... All these games earned them the recognition of their peers around the world and the respect of the British magazine Zero who tagged them the Gallic Bitmap Brothers (amid lots of Richard Clayderman jokes). OK, they also made «Shaq Fu». So what ?

Highslide JS
Les Voyageurs du temps (PC)
Highslide JS
Operation Stealth (PC)
Highslide JS
Croisière pour un cadavre (PC)
Highslide JS
Another World (PC)
Highslide JS
Flashback (PC)
Highslide JS
Fade to Black (PC)

Cryo
This team of ex-ERE Informatique members started exactly where Exxos had stopped : their first game, the gorgeous «Extase», shares the spirit of Exxos games. They were immediately supported by Virgin Games, who offered them the license of the movie "Dune". "Supported" may not be the right word, because Virgin Games dangerously interfered in the development of «Dune» and «KGB». However, these two awesome games gave Cryo the international recognition they deserved. In less than two years, they became the most advanced French entertainment software company in terms of graphic technology and art direction. «Megarace», «Commander Blood» and «Lost Eden» impressed the whole gaming world, even if their design is arguable - after all, «Megarace» is just a slower «Fire and Forget» with Silicon Graphics background and FMV. Following the development of their 3D engine Omni3D and the tremendous success of «Versailles», Cryo created several historical adventure games («Egypte», «Chine»), as well as «Atlantis» and «Atlantis II», but this mainstream direction disheartened lots of traditional gamers, and the flawed and/or buggy «Deo Gratias» and «Saga» didn't help.

Highslide JS
Extase (Amiga)
Highslide JS
Dune (PC)
Highslide JS
KGB (PC)
Highslide JS
Megarace (PC)
Highslide JS
Lost Eden (PC)
Highslide JS
Versailles (PC)

Kalisto
These Dune fans from Bordeaux originally started as Atreid Concept and worked mainly on Macintosh : «Cogito», «S.C.Out», «Tiny Skweeks», the Mac port of «Powermonger»... They renamed themselves Kalisto and released the very enjoyable «Fury of the Furries». Then they were bought by Mindscape, became Mindscape Bordeaux, released «Al Unser Jr Arcade Racing» and «Warriors», quit Mindscape, got their old name back and gained wider recogntion with «Dark Earth», «Nightmare Creatures» and «Ultimate Race Pro».

Highslide JS
Cogito (PC)
Highslide JS
Tiny Skweeks (PC)
Highslide JS
Fury of the Furries (PC)
Highslide JS
Al Unser Jr Arcade Racing (PC)
Highslide JS
Warriors (PC)
Highslide JS
Dark Earth (PC)

Adeline Software
This development studio founded by several ex-creators of «Alone in the Dark» made the fabulous «Little Big Adventure» and «Little Big Adventure 2», and the very decent «Time Commando». Need I say more ?

Highslide JS
Little Big Adventure (PC)
Highslide JS
Little Big Adventure 2 (PC)
Highslide JS
Time Commando (PC)

titre The Magazines

If you want to read old French computer and game magazines, there's only one website to know : Abandonware Magazines. It's not complete yet, but the most important stuff is there. And the four major multi-format computer game magazines of the 80's and 90's are :

Hebdogiciel (1983-1987)
This newspaper, whose name is a portmanteau of "hebdomadaire"/"weekly" and "logiciel"/"software", was full of listings of games sent by its readers for all kinds of computers available in France. A few months later it started to feature short news and reviews of games, and a bit later reviews of comics, movies and music. What made Hebdogiciel so unique ? Its "fuck you" attitude. Written in a familiar language and illustrated with stupid cartoons, it mercilessly ridiculed bad games and incompetent manufacturers. Some of their provocative headlines were legendary : "This computer is dangerous" (introducing a laudative review of the CPC), "Sorry, computing is shit", "IBM : clowns !" or "Amstrad : mickeys !". Some reviews looked like they'd been written on drugs. Hebdogiciel made a lot of enemies and won a few lawsuits before ceasing abruptly its publication in 1987.

Tilt (1982-1994)
The best and most famous video game magazine of the 80's and early 90's. Embellished with Jérôme Tesseyre's pixelated covers, it was neither too serious nor too immature, usually reliable and well written and featured great articles. In 1991, they tried to rejuvenate their editorial policy and the quality of the magazine progressively dropped until its demise in early 1994.

Joystick (1990-2012)
Originally a weekly magazine named Joystick Hebdo, it became monthly and rebranded Joystick in 1990. During their first three years of existence, they scored the games too generously, but it got better later, and anyway the quality of the layout and the texts made up for it. Influenced by the Monty Python and some French humorists (Les Nuls, Pierre Desproges), humor was the trademark of Joystick for more than a decade : cartoons, fake news, running gags, silly videos on their CD-ROM...

Génération 4 (1987-2004)
Another long-running magazine, vaguely looking like Zzap!64 when it was launched. It changed its internal and external layout more often than necessary, and its humor was often heavy-heanded, but it was still interesting.

Highslide JS
Highslide JS
Highslide JS
Highslide JS
Four covers of these magazines (source : Abandonware Magazines)

titre The Final Word

Well, that was a long article. I had to omit a few development teams and magazines, as well as a few features like the most important personalities, the demo groups and other things like that. That should be enough to understand how the French game scene was shaped and why it still fascinates some computer gamers and designers 20 years later. If you have any question, feel free to ask us on Twitter, Facebook or on our forum, we'll be glad to help. A la prochaine fois !



Il y a quelques jours, le youtubeur et podcasteur @dosnostalgic a affirmé que la genèse de la scène micro-ludique française ne lui était pas familière et demandait s'il existe des ressources en anglais sur le sujet. Nous ne savions pas s'il existe une telle ressource sur le web, mais c'est bien évidemment notre domaine d'expertise, et nous sommes toujours prêt à fournir des infos. Comme on dit en France, "on n'est jamais si bien servi que par soi-même", voici donc une présentation de cette scène dans les années 80 et 90 pour notre lectorat anglophone.

titre Une brève histoire de l'informatique familiale en France

Les débuts de l'informatique familiale en France sont un peu désordonnés. Au Royaume-Uni, le ZX81 avait remporté un énorme succès parce qu'il était bon marché et vendu par courrier et à WH Smith. Rien de tel en France : il y avait tout un tas de modèles vendus dans les boutiques d'informatique, et ils étaient souvent chers. Plusieurs créateurs de jeux ont commencé à programmer sur TI-99/4A, ZX81 et même le méconnu Memotech MTX 512. En 1984, le parc informatique français comprenait 170 000 ZX81, 30 000 ZX Spectrum et 50 000 Oric 1; le C64 se vendait à peine plus que le ZX81 à cause de sa mauvaise distribution. Des constructeurs informatiques français ont créé leurs propres modèles : Exelvision et le EXL 100 (avec son clavier et ses joysticks/pavés numériques sans fil), Micronique et son Hector HRX, Matra avec l'Alice (dont la seule qualité à retenir est l'illustration de sa boîte signée Moebius), et le plus important, Thomson avec le TO7 et le MO5. Le TO7 comprenait un lecteur de cartouches ROM interne et un crayon optique pour dessiner sur l'écran de la télé. Le MO5, dont les logiciels étaient incompatibles avec le TO7, était moins cher, avait plus de RAM (48 Ko contre 8 Ko pour le TO7), mais un lecteur de cassettes séparé, et il était connu pour ses touches en gomme. Tous deux avaient une résolution graphique légèrement supérieure au ZX Spectrum.

Le succès des ordinateurs Thomson fut garanti par le célèbre plan gouvernemental "Informatique pour tous". En février 1985, le gouvernement soumit un projet de loi pour l'industrie française du logiciel en pleine croissance (avec des lois sur le copyright et contre le piratage) et acheta plus de 120 000 ordinateurs pour équiper les écoles françaises et aider les enfants à découvrir l'informatique. Apple avait promis d'installer ses usines européennes en France et a failli remporter le marché, mais au final presque tous les ordinateurs commandés furent des Thomson. Ce plan n'a eu d'effet qu'à court terme : le personnel enseignant n'était pas formé à l'informatique, et bientôt les machines furent abandonnées. Cependant, nombre d'enfants ont découvert l'informatique avec un MO5 ou un TO7/70 (une version améliorée du TO7), et ces deux modèles devinrent, avec le Minitel, les deux ordinateurs 8 bits les plus emblématiques de la France des années 80 - l'association française de préservation des jeux vidéo MO5.COM leur doit son nom. Si vous voulez essayer le meilleur émulateur d'ordinateurs Thomson et leurs logiciels, DCMOTO est le site à visiter.

Le plan "Informatique pour tous" a eu une autre conséquence : il a considérablement encouragé le développement de logiciels éducatifs, par des sociétés spécialisées (Carraz) ou des sociétés de jeux vidéo. Coktel Vision a produit des douzaines de logiciels éducatifs pour enfin profiter d'un succès immense et bien mérité en 1990 avec l'excellente gamme «Adi» (qui est, pour moi, le «Dungeon Master» des logiciels éducatifs).

L'autre évènement majeur de l'informatique domestique en France fut la sortie de l'Amstrad CPC 464 fin 1984, qui fit un carton monumental. Plusieurs facteurs expliquent ce succès : le CPC 464 n'éait pas cher, il était avec son petit moniteur (un avantage décisif quand presque tous les foyers n'avaient qu'un seul poste de télé), il était facile à utiliser ("plug and play", ajouterais-je même), sa conception était remarquable, sa distribution était excellente (il était vendu en grand magasin et dans le catalogue La Redoute), et ses publicités françaises mettaient en vedette un crocodile amusant qui est devenu une des mascottes les plus populaires de la publicité des années 80. Un tiers des 8 millions de CPC vendus en huit ans ont été écoulés en France, et Amstrad avait même son propre salon informatique annuel, l'Amstrad Expo à Paris, de 1986 à 1990. Tous les autres systèmes 8 bits ont rapidement décliné. Pour découvrir l'univers du CPC "à la française", je vous conseille de visiter le site de référence CPCRulez.

Le marché des micros et consoles a ensuite suivi le même chemin que le reste de l'Europe : la guerre entre ST et Amiga, la disponibilité tardive des consoles, l'ascension du PC comme machine de jeu...

titre La soi-disante "French touch"

Les Français aiment bien frimer avec la "French touch", une expression prétentieuse presque toujours invoquée pour décrire les jeux français influents ou très bien vendus - curieusement, on entend moins parler de "French touch" quand on évoque les jeux Titus. Les étrangers préfèrent qualifier les jeux français de "bizarres". Dans son numéro d'octobre 1991, le magazine Amiga Power a publié un article amusant de quatre pages intitulé "Pourquoi les jeux français sont-ils si bizarres ?" et n'a pas réussi à obtenir une réponse satisfaisante. Pourquoi, alors ?

Au début des années 80, les programmeurs français ont commencé à créer des jeux à partir de rien. Ils n'étaient pas influencés par les jeux américains : les ordinateurs populaires aux USA (Apple II, Atari 400, C64) n'ont pas conquis le marché français. Avec l'arrivée du ZX Spectrum et plus tard de l'Amstrad CPC, les Français furent plus au fait de la production britannique. Par exemple, les jeux Ultimate furent l'inspiration principale de «Crafton & Xunk» et «Little Big Adventure». Comme les Anglais, les Français ont créé beaucoup de jeux d'action, et également des jeux de sport, mais dans des proportions inattendues. Il est étrange que, pendant une décennie, un pays aussi accro au foot a produit moins de jeux de foot que de sports d'hiver et de tennis, et pas un seul jeu de gestion d'équipe de football à ma connaissance. Et la France a produit beaucoup plus de jeux d'aventure, dont un nombre significatif d'enquêtes policières - après tout, la France est le pays de la série noire. Oui, mais pourquoi ?

A mon humble avis, un ingrédient essentiel de l'esprit des jeux français est l'influence considérable de la bande dessinée. Les développeurs français ont grandi en lisant les BD franco-belges et des magazines comme Spirou, Tintin, Pilote et Pif Gadget, et cela se voit. Certains jeux français ressemblent à des BD («B.A.T.», «Crash Garrett»), d'autres les copient même (le chat du «Passager du temps» est celui de Gaston Lagaffe). Il n'est pas surprenant que, pendant que les éditeurs anglais étaient obsédés par les conversions de films et de jeux d'arcade, les éditeurs français avaient un faible pour les adaptations de BD sur ordinateurs. La liste est longue : Coktel Vision a fait quelques jeux Astérix, Lucky Luke et Blueberry, Cobra Soft did a fait un jeu Blake & Mortimer («La Marque Jaune») et «Turlogh le rôdeur», Ubi Soft a édité un jeu Gaston Lagaffe («M'Enfin !») et «Ranx», et Infogrames, et bien... Infogrames a fait toutes les BD qu'ils pouvaient : «Les Passagers du vent», «Iznogoud», «Bobo», Bob Morane, «La Quête de l'oiseau du temps», «The Toyottes», «Tintin sur la lune», "Les Tuniques bleues" («North & South»)... Et ils ont remis ça dans les années 90 sur consoles 16 bits avec Tintin, Astérix, les Schtroumpfs, Lucky Luke et Spirou.

Une autre immense influence était l'extraordinaire magazine Métal hurlant, qui contenait tout ce dont un geek pouvait rêver : science-fiction, rock'n roll, BD d'avant-garde ou en ligne claire, critiques de films, livres et disques, et même une colonne sur les jeus de strategie et les wargames signée Général-Baron Staff - alias Jean-Patrick Manchette, un auteur de polar réputé, et l'auteur de la traduction française de "Watchmen". Si vous voulez voir à quel point Métal hurlant était influent, jetez un oeil à la production d'ERE Informatique et Exxos : c'est un hommage intégral à l'esprit de ce magazine et de ses BD. La publicité française de «L'Arche du Captain Blood» et les écrans de «Crash Garrett» affichent même un logo "Métal hurlant logiciels" !

Le lien entre BD et jeux vidéo français n'est pas seulement une question d'influence : il y avait de fortes connexions entre le milieu de la BD et le milieu informatique dans les années 80. Plusieurs magazines important de jeux informatiques contenaient des BD plus ou moins longues, et parfois une ou deux pages de critiques de BD. Par exemple, Micro News proposait une BD en feuilleton sur les jeux vidéo, "Bargon Attack", qui a été finalement adaptée en jeu d'aventure, et son créateur, Rachid Chebli, est devenu graphiste chez Coktel Vision - tout comme Thierry Ségur. Carali était l'illustrateur du journal Hebdogiciel, son frère Edika, un des dessinateurs français les plus fous, a fait les jaquettes de deux jeux CPC confidentiels («Bad Max» et «Les Dents de sa mère»), et son fils Olivier Ka fut testeur de jeux pour Joystick. Amstrad Cent Pour Cent a fait faire ses couvertures par des dessinateurs plus ou moins connus. Bruno Bellamy a dessiné dans plusieurs magazines de jeux. Et cela fonctionnait aussi avec les éditeurs : Jean Solé était un fan de Mac et un collaborateur de Froggy Software. Daniel Hochard, alias Imagex, a fait quelques BD avant de devenir graphiste pour des jeux vidéo et designer dans le textile. Philippe Cazaumayou a illustré quelques boîtes pour Infogrames.

La "bizarrerie" des concepteurs français vient tout simplement de leur lecture intensive de bandes dessinées, et si vous avez lu n'importe quelle oeuvre de Moebius ou de Philippe Druillet, vous savez à quel point elles peuvent être imaginatives. Cela pourrait aussi être une raison pour laquelle les Français ont crée tant de jeux d'aventure textuels dans les années 80, avec beaucoup d'images, peu d'animations et des textes courts - malheureusement pas de la même qualité littéraire que les jeux Infocom ou Magnetic Scrolls. Et cela pourrait expliquer pourquoi la France est devenue le meilleur et le plus productif des pays d'Europe en matière de jeux d'aventure graphiques - et l'un des premiers à le faire : la version ST du «Manoir de Mortevielle» est sortie à peu près en même temps que «Maniac Mansion».

titre Les acteurs

L'âge d'or du jeu français sur micros est encadré par deux dates. 1983 est l'année de naissance de trois acteurs-clés de cette industrie : ERE Informatique, Infogrames et Loriciels. 2002 marque le début d'une crise du marché de jeux vidéo qui va emporter plusieurs sociétés importantes en trois ans : Lankhor fin 2001, Cryo et Kalisto en 2002, Delphine Software d'abord en 2002, puis en 2004, Arxel Tribe et Silmarils en 2003, Adeline Software et Titus en 2004. Voici les plus importants acteurs de cette ère dans l'ordre chronologique :

ERE Informatique / Exxos
ERE Informatique fonctionnait différemment des autres éditeurs : ils n'avaient quasiment pas d'équipe de développement interne. Ils fonctionnaient comme un éditeur de livres : ils recevaient des projets et démos de développeurs externes, le directeur de collection Philippe Ulrich choisissait les jeux assez bons pour être publiés, et l'artiste Michel Rho dessinait les écrans-titres et les boîtes de jeux. La gamme ERE Informatique est un mélange cohérent de titres d'action et d'aventure, avec un net penchant pour la science-fiction et les scénarios originaux. Certains de leurs jeux les plus mémorables sont «Macadam Bumper», un très bon logiciel de construction de flipper, «Crafton & Xunk», alias «Get Dexter», la réponse française aux jeux Ultimate, le jeu d'aventure «SRAM», le mignon «Bubble Ghost», et le jeu de strip-poker «Teenage Queen». ERE Informatique a aussi publié les premiers jeux de Paul CuissetPhoenix») et Stéphane PicqBirdie»).
En 1987, ERE Informatique fut racheté par Infogrames. En 1988, ses membres lancèrent le label Exxos pour leur propres jeux, plus ambitieux. Le premier jeu Exxos, «L'Arche du Captain Blood», fut une réussite artistique et commerciale. Suivirent «Crash Garrett», «Purple Saturn Day» et «Kult». Les développeurs affirmaient qu'Exxos était une divinité leur donnant l'inspiration pour leurs jeux. Chaque fois que le développement d'un jeu Exxos était terminé, Philippe Ulrich sacrifiait en public un des ordinateurs utilisés pour le programmer au cri de "ata ata hoglo hulu". Malheureusement, en raison des difficultés financières d'Infogrames, l'équipe d'ERE Informatique démissionnèrent collectivement en 1989 pour former Cryo.

Infogrames
La compagnie au tatou est devenue dans les années 80 le premier producteur de logiciel de divertissement de France. La recette de leur succès : le bagout de leur co-fondateur Bruno Bonnell, des logiciels éducatifs, plusieurs jeux d'enquête policière («L'Affaire», «L'Affaire Vera Cruz», «L'Héritage»), beaucoup d'adaptations de BD et quelques autres choses comme «Mandragore», un des premiers jeux de rôle français sur micros, «Bivouac» ou «Marche à l'ombre». Ils achetèrent ERE Informatique et la propriété intellectuelle de Cobra Soft, et trouvèrent en Epyx un distributeur américain fiable. Tout allait bien, mais Infogrames faillit couler à la fin des années 80 pour plusieurs raisons : le flop des lamentables jeux Bob Morane, l'annulation d'une fusion prometteuse avec Epyx et la fermeture de leur distributeur français FIL. Ils furent sauvés de justesse par leur contrat pour la distribution européenne d'un jeu appelé «SimCity». Infogrames recouvre la santé et commença le développement de différents types de jeux : mondes en 3D originaux («The Light Corridor», «Alpha Waves»), jeux de rôle («Drakkhen»), sport («Advantage Tennis»), et, bien sûr, aventure : «Eternam», «Shadow of the Comet» et le référentiel «Alone in the Dark». Infogrames diversifia ses activités dans le CDTV, le CD-I, les consoles, la télématique (le réseau Infonie), et ce n'était que le début...

Loriciels
Après le tatou, le chaton ! Fondé par Laurant Weill et Marc Bayle, Loriciels fut un des développeurs et éditeurs les plus prolifiques sur systèmes 8 bits : quelques utilitaires, mais avant tout beaucoup de jeux - principalement action, aventures textuelles et réflexion. La qualité des jeux était inégale, mais certains sont inoubliables ou historiquement importants : «L'Aigle d'or» (de Louis-Marie Rocques, qui forma ensuite Silmarils), «Le 5ème Axe» (un excellent clone d'«Impossible Mission» pour MO5), les deux premiers jeux publiés d'Eric ChahiInfernal Runner» et «Le Pacte»), «Sapiens» (une simulation de survie en monde ouvert à l'ère préhistorique), l'amusant «Billy la banlieue», les aventures isométriques «Bactron», «MGT» et «Top Secret»... Basé près de Paris, Loriciels ouvra deux petits bureaux à Grenoble et Annecy et migra vers les systèmes 16 bits avec là encore plusieurs réussites : «Mach 3», un des premiers jeux avec musique et voix digitalisées sur l'écran-titre (avec le haut-parleur interne du PC), «Turbo Cup» (vendu avec une voiture miniature et sponsorisé par le pilote automobile René Metge qui arborait le logo Loriciels sur sa voiture), l'adorable «Skweek», «West Phaser» et son pistolet optique... En 1990, la société raccourcit son nom en Loriciel, adopta un nouveau logo plus branché et essaya de développer des jeux plus complexes, comme «Panza Kick Boxing», mais ils commencèrent à rencontrer des difficultés financières, sortirent plusieurs compilations pour tenir le coup et fermèrent finalement en 1994. N'hésitez pas à consulter le site Loriciel.net pour découvrir leur catalogue.

Froggy Software
Fondé en 1984 par Jean-Louis Le Breton, Froggy Software avait une activité bien spécifique : ils ne publiaient que des jeux d'aventure textuels pour l'Apple II. Cet ordinateur ne s'était pas beaucoup vendu en France, et ils refusaient de mettre des protections anti-copie dans leurs logiciels, aucun de leurs jeux n'a donc rencontré un grand succès. En 1986, ils sortirent deux jeux d'aventure pour Macintosh et fermèrent boutique l'année suivante. Jean-Louis Le Breton a écrit une courte histoire de la société sur son site web.

Cobra Soft
Probablement inconnu hors de France, ce fut un des éditeurs français les plus novateurs des années 80. Leur plus célèbre production est Meurtres, une série d'aventures policières. Meurtres sur l'Atlantique était vendu dans un grand dossier en carton, et les boîtes des trois jeux suivants contenaient plusieurs objets physiques et indices pour résoudre l'enquête : lettres, coupures de journaux, pierres gravées... La boîte de [jeu_575,Murders in Space] était si pleine qu'elle était difficile à fermer ! La simulation de croiseur HMS Cobra était vendue dans une boîte de jeu de société contenant une carte, une règle, un rapporteur, deux manuels et un livre de 300 pages. Cobra Soft sortit également la première adaptation d'un film français sur micros ([jeu_3458,Les Ripoux]) et deux adaptations de jeux de plateur («Maxi Bourse», «Full Metal Planete»). Leur dirigeant et concepteur en chef, Bertrand Brocard, a co-fondé récemment le CNJV et est une des personnalités les actives dans le domaine de la préservation des jeux vidéo en France.

Coktel Vision / Tomahawk
Fondé en 1984 par Roland Oskian, Coktel Vision produisait le même type de logiciels qu'Infogrames : logiciels éducatifs et adaptations de BD, ainsi que les jeux historiques et innovateurs conçus par Muriel Tramis : «Mewilo» et «Freedom». «Mewilo» lui valut une médaille de la mairie de Paris. En 1987, ils utilisèrent le label Tomahawk pour éditer leurs jeux et, avec l'aide de François Nédelec, ils développèrent plusieurs types de jeux : erotisme («Emmanuelle», «Geisha»), course («Paris Dakar 1990», «Skidoo»), combat («No Exit») et exploration en 3D («Galactic Empire»). Cependant, ces jeux ont obtenu des critiques mitigées. En 1990, avec l'incroyable succès d'«Adi», ils décidèrent de concentrer leurs effots sur les jeux d'aventure (la trilogie Gobliiins, «Fascination», «Bargon Attack») et les jeux en 3D («A.G.E.», «Inca»). Ils améliorèrent significativement leurs talents en graphisme et furent une des premières société françaises à travailler sur CD-ROM («E.S.S. Mega», «Fascination»). Ils furent remarqués par Sierra qui leur confia leur distribution européenne. En 1993, ils furent finalement achtés par Sierra et devinrent officiellement Sierra France. Ils ont cessé le développement de jeux en 1996.

Microïds
Soutenu financièrement par Loriciels durant leurs premières années d'existence, Microïds a eu une carrière étonnament longue sans pour autant avoir de titre inoubliable dans leur catalogue. Leurs jeux les plus notables : la trilogie Super Ski, «Grand Prix 500 2», le jeu de réflexion «Swap», «Nicky Boom», «Dominium»et «Genesia» (deux jeux de stratégie perfectibles avec des idées intéressantes)...

Titus
Oh la la ! La compagnie que l'on adore détester. Après une longue série de mauvais jeux («Crazy Cars», «Fire and Forget», [jeu_2182,Wild Streets]), Titus signa un contrat de distribution et de développement avec Disney Software en 1990 et fit le non moins mauvais «Dick Tracy» - le contrat ne dura pas longtemps, un an plus tard Disney Software signa avec Infogrames. Titus se rattrapa ensuite avec plusieurs très bons jeux de plateformes : «Prehistorik», «The Blues Brothers», «Les Aventures de Moktar»... Et «Crazy Cars 3» est le meilleur des trois. Les jeux sortis après 1994 sont en grande partie oubliables. C'est encore un total mystère à mes yeux qu'avec un catalogue aussi médiocre, ils sont devenus assez gros pour acheter Digital Integration et être actionnaire majoritaire d'Interplay et [cie_359,Virgin Interactive]. Leurs investisseurs n'avaient-ils pas mieux à faire de leur argent ?

Ubi Soft
L'histoire de cette société fondée en 1986 par les frères Guillemot peut être scindée en deux parties : avant et après 1995. L'Ubi Soft pré-1995 publia - et parfois développa - des jeux français historiquement importants : «Fer & flamme», «Zombi», «B.A.T.», le vaporware - ou, comme nous le disons plus poétiquement, l'Arlésienne - «Iron Lord». Nous pouvons ajouter à cette liste l'agréable «Jupiter's Masterdrive» et «The Teller», un des premiers jeux de Michel Ancel. Mais Ubi Soft était aussi un distributeur de logiciels. Ils importaient en France les jeux de certains des plus célèbres éditeurs internationaux : Cinemaware, Spectrum HoloByte, Activision, Mirrorsoft, Elite, Domark... Ils publièrent aussi les premiers jeux de l'équipe allemande Blue Byte. En 1991, leur activité d'éditeur s'arrêta presque totalement alors qu'ils poursuivaient la distributipn de logiciels étrangers (LucasArts, Novalogic, Bethesda Softworks, Adventure Soft) et sortaient pléthore de compilations de vieux jeux. Pendant ce temps, ils ouvrirent en secret des centres de développement en France, Roumanie et, plus tard, Canada. En 1995, Ubi Soft fit son grand retour dans le développement micro-ludique avec «Action Soccer» (conçu en France, programmé en Roumanie), et, bien sûr, «Rayman» - on connaît la suite.

Silmarils
Cette société formée par les frères Louis-Marie Rocques et André Rocques n'a jamais essayé d'ouvrir des bureaux dans d'autres pays ou de conquérir le monde, elle a gardé une taille raisonnable durant toute son existence. Probablement influencés par Psygnosis, graphiquement parlant (comparez leurs boîtes), Silmarils a principalement produit des jeux d'action/adventure (le hit «Targhan», «Colorado», «Starblade», «Metal Mutant»), des jeux de gestion futuristes («Storm Master», «Transarctica») et des jeux de rôles (la trilogie Ishar). Ces jeux avaient souvent des erreurs de conception maladroites, mais ils avaient aussi une forte personnalité graphique et des scénarios et univers inventifs. Si vous ne voulez pas y jouer, jetez-y au moins un oeil, ils le valent bien.

Lankhor
Cette petite société a gagné sa place au panthéon grâce aux aventures de Jérôme Lange, les révolutionnaires «Le Manoir de Mortevielle» et «Maupiti Island» : interface à la souris, voix digitalisées pour tous les dialogues (sans aucune carte sonore), conception innovatrice, atmosphères et intrigues travaillées. la version Amiga de «Maupiti Island» est toujours un chef d'oeuvre du jeu d'aventure à mes yeux. Leur jeu suivant, «Black Sect», fut un échec et les mit dans une mauvaise situation financière. Ils sortirent également l'excellent et ultra-rapide jeu de course «Vroom» sur ST et Amiga, quelques logiciels éducatifs («Rody & Mastico»), et plusieurs jeux créés par des développeurs indépendants, dans la tradition d'ERE Informatique : des jeux d'action pour Amiga et ST («Outzone», «G.Nius») et des jeux d'aventure pour CPC («Alive», «Fugitif»). Pour en savoir plus, visitez le très bon site Lankhor.net.

Ocean France
OK, Ocean était une société anglaise, mais leur bureau français, ouvert en 1988 et dirigé par Marc Djan, a produit quelques-unes de leurs meilleurs conversions d'arcade («Operation Wolf», «Pang», «Toki», l'inédit «Snow Bros»), ainsi que «Beach Volley» et «Ivanhoe». Ils méritaient une mention ici.

Delphine Software
Delphine Software était la division de développement micro-ludique mise en place par Delphine Records. Elle était gérée par Michael Sportouch et fut rejointe par Paul Cuisset et Eric Chahi. Après deux jeux d'action («Bio Challenge» et «Castle Warrior»), ils furent les premiers en France de s'inspirer de Lucasfilm Games et Sierra On-Line pour créer des aventures plus dynamiques, et baptisèrent ainsi leur gamme "Delphine cinématique". Ils sortirent une exceptionnelle série de jeux d'aventure et d'action/aventure cinématiques : «Les Voyageurs du temps», «Operation Stealth», «Croisière pour un cadavre», «Another World», «Flashback», «Fade to Black»... Tous ces jeux leur valurent la reconnaissance de leurs pairs autour du monde et le respect du magazine anglais Zero qui les appela les "Bitmap Brothers gaulois" (parmi tout un tas de blagues sur Richard Clayderman). OK, ils ont aussi commis «Shaq Fu». Et alors ?

Cryo
Cette équipe d'ex-ERE Informatique commança exactement là où Exxos s'était arrêté : leur premier jeu, le splendide «Extase», partage l'esprit des jeux Exxos. Ils furent immédiatement soutenus par Virgin Games, qui leur confia la licence du film "Dune". "Soutenu" n'est peut-être pas le mot approprié, car Virgin Games interféra dangereusement dans le développement de «Dune» et «KGB». Cependant, ces deux jeux remarquables offrirent à Cryo la reconnaissance internationale qu'ils méritaient. En moins de deux ans, ils devinrent la société française de logiciels de divertissement la plus avancée en matière de technologie graphique et de direction artistique. «Megarace», «Commander Blood» et «Lost Eden» impressionnèrent le monde du jeu vidéo, même si leur conception est discutable - après tout, «Megarace» n'est qu'un «Fire and Forget» plus lent avec des décors sous Silicon Graphics et de la vidéo. A la suite du développement de leur moteur 3D Omni3D et l'immense succès de «Versailles», Cryo créa plusieurs jeux d'aventure historiques («Egypte», «Chine»), ainsi qu'«Atlantis» et «Atlantis II», mais cette approche grand public découragea beaucoup de joueurs traditionnels, et les décevants et/ou buggés «Deo Gratias» et «Saga» n'arrangèrent rien.

Kalisto
Ces fans de Dune originaires de Bordeaux débutèrent sous le nom d'Atreid Concept et travaillaient principalement sur Macintosh : «Cogito», «S.C.Out», «Tiny Skweeks», la version Mac de «Powermonger»... Ils se rebaptisèrent Kalisto et sortirent le très sympathique «Fury of the Furries». Puis ils furent achetés par Mindscape, devinrent Mindscape Bordeaux, sortirent «Al Unser Jr Arcade Racing» et «Warriors», quittèrent Mindscape, reprirent leur ancien nom et gagnèrent une plus grande reconnaissance avec «Dark Earth», «Nightmare Creatures» et «Ultimate Race Pro».

Adeline Software
Ce studio de développement formé par plusieurs ex-créateurs d'«Alone in the Dark» a réalisé les fabuleux «Little Big Adventure» et «Little Big Adventure 2», et le très correct «Time Commando». Y a-t-il besoin d'en dire plus ?

titre Les magazines

Si vous voulez lire de vieux magazines français d'informatique et de jeux vidéo, il n'y a qu'un site à connaître : Abandonware Magazines. Il n'est pas encore complet, mais l'essentiel s'y trouve. Et les quatre magazines micro-ludiques multi-formats majeurs des années 80 et 90 sont :

Hebdogiciel (1983-1987)
Ce journal, dont le nom est un mot-valise constitué de "hebdomadaire" et "logiciel", était rempli de listings de jeux envoyés par ses lecteurs pour tous les types d'ordinateurs disponibles en France. Quelques mois plus tard, il commença à proposer de courts articles d'actualité et des tests de jeux, et un peu plus tard des critiques de BD, films et musique. Qu'est-ce qui rendit Hebdogiciel si unique ? Son caractère de fouteur de merde. Ecrit dans un langage familier et illustré par des dessins idiots, il ridiculisait impitoyablement les mauvais jeux et les fabricants incompétents. Certaines de leurs une provocatrices étaient légendaires : "Cet ordinateur est dangereux" (en introduction d'un banc d'essai louangeur du CPC), "Désolé, mais l'informatique, c'est de la merde", "IBM : charlots !" ou "Amstrad : des mickeys !". Certaines critiques semblent avoir été écrites sous l'emprise de drogues. Hebdogiciel s'est fait beaucoup d'ennemis et a gagné quelques procès avant de cesser abruptement sa publication en 1987.

Tilt (1982-1994)
Le meilleur et plus célèbre magazine de jeux vidéo jusqu'au début des années 90. Embelli par les couvertures pixellisées de Jérôme Tesseyre, il n'était ni trop sérieux, ni trop immature, généralement fiable et bien écrit, et contenait de très bons articles. En 1991, ils tentèrent de rajeunir leur ligne éditoriale et la qualité du magazine baissa progressivement jusqu'à leur disparition début 1994.

Joystick (1990-2012)
Au départ un hebdomadaire du nom de Joystick Hebdo, il devint mensuel et fut renommé Joystick in 1990. Durant ses trois premières années d'existence, ils notaient les jeux trop généreusement, mais cela s'est ensuite amélioré, et de toute façon la qualité de la maquette et les textes compensaient cela. Influencé par les Monty Python et certains humoristes français (Les Nuls, Pierre Desproges), l'humour fut la marque de fabrique de Joystick pendant plus d'une décennie : dessins, fausses informations, gags récurrents, vidéos stupides sur leurs CD-ROM...

Génération 4 (1987-2004)
un autre magazine à la longue existence, qui ressemblait vaguement à Zzap!64 à ses débuts. Il changea sa maquette intérieure et extérieure plus souvent que nécessaire, et son humour était souvent lourd, mais il était néanmoins intéressant.

titre La conclusion

Hé bien, c'était un long article. J'ai dû écarter quelques équipes de développement et magazines, ainsi que des sujets comme les personnalités importantes, les groupes de démos et d'autres choses de ce type. Cela devrait suffire pour comprendre comment la scène française s'est formée et pourquoi elle continue de fasciner joueurs et créateurs 20 ans plus tard. Si vous avez des questions, n'hésitez pas à nous demander sur Twitter, Facebook ou sur notre forum, nous vous aiderons volontiers. A la prochaine fois !
Les commentaires

Barbarian_bros
le 21/01/2018 20:49
Chouette, un chapitre bonus d' "Insérez la disquette 2" pour les anglophones.
Ajouter un commentaire
Pour ajouter un commentaire, vous devez être connecté, ou vous inscrire à la zone membres.
> Connexion / Inscription











Vous pouvez aussi faire un don via Paypal :


Partenaires : Hébergement web - WoW - Association MO5 - Megatest.fr - Emu-France - Association WDA - Another Retro World - Planète Aventure